Tuesday, June 23, 2015

Cleveland Division of Police - General Police Orders (6/2/2015)


Below is a copy of the Cleveland Division of Police - GENERAL POLICE ORDERS. This is an up-to-date copy as of June 2nd, 2015.

See below for the Table of Contents, sections changed and/or updated in 2014 & 2015, and an embedded copy of the Orders that can be downloaded as a searchable PDF document (25MB):


Sections updated in 2014-2015

1.1.06  06/10/14  Smoking Regulations
1.1.11  01/01/14  Disciplinary Guidance (1.1.11 A)
1.1.19  05/07/15  Body Armor
1.1.24  01/04/14  Field Training Program (1.1.24 A-B)
1.1.26  07/08/14  Overtime Card
1.1.37  04/15/14  Business Cards
1.1.38  03/02/15  Post Traumatic Incident Protocol
1.1.45  03/10/15  Return to Duty (1.1.45 A)
1.2.01  03/18/14  Organizational Structure (1.2.01A)
1.3.11  05/15/14  Ammunition and Firearm Regulations (1.3.11 A B C)
1.3.16  02/13/15  Bureau of Integrity Control Call-Up
3.1.05  05/14/14  Distribution and Handling of Ammunition Boxes (3.1.05A)
1.3.26  06/11/14  Restricted Duty (1.3.26 A)
1.3.27  08/04/14  Disclosure of Information
2.1.01  08/08/14  Use of Force
2.1.02  05/14/14  Beanbag Shotguns (2.1.02 A)
2.3.05  06/02/15  Willard Park Garage Parking
3.2.02  05/22/15  Vehicle Pursuits
3.2.20  02/02/15  Wearable Camera System (WCS)
3.3.02  03/15/12  Field Force
4.1.14  06/03/14  Combined Abduction Response Team
5.1.01  12/18/14  Curfew Citations
5.1.03  07/09/14   Cuyahoga Cnty Juvenile Detention Center Admission (Rescinded)
7.1.09  05/12/15  Prisoner DNA Collection
8.1.01  03/26/15  Damage to City Vehicles
8.1.04  05/14/14  Hit Skip Investigations
9.1.01  07/23/14  Communications: Radio Protocol
10.3.02  06/18/14 Return of Firearms


Table of Contents:

CHAPTER 1  ORG AND MANAGEMENT
  • SECTION 1.1  ADMINISTRATION
  • SECTION 1.2  ORGANIZATION
  • SECTION 1.3  MANAGEMENT

CHAPTER 2 LEGAL
  • SECTION 2.1  USE OF FORCE
  • SECTION 2.2  SEARCH and SEIZURE
  • SECTION 2.3  SUBPOENAS and COURT

CHAPTER 3 PATROL
  • SECTION 3.1  ZONE CARS
  • SECTION 3.2  PATROL PROCEDURES
  • SECTION 3.3  DISTURBANCES AND DISASTERS
  • SECTION 3.4  ENFORCEMENT

CHAPTER 4 INVESTIGATIONS
  • SECTION 4.1  CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS
  • SECTION 4.2  DRUG/VICE INVESTIGATIONS

CHAPTER 5 JUVENILE PROCEDURES
  • SECTION 5.1  JUVENILE ARRESTS

CHAPTER 6 REPORTING PROCEDURES
  • SECTION 6.1  NON-CRIMINAL REPORTS
  • SECTION 6.1  CRIME REPORTS

CHAPTER 7 PRISONER HANDLING
  • SECTION 7.1  JAIL PROCEDURES
  • SECTION 7.2  PRISONER: MEDICAL/HOSPITAL PROCEDURES

CHAPTER 8 TRAFFIC
  • SECTION 8.1  ACCIDENTS
  • SECTION 8.2  ENFORCEMENT

CHAPTER 9 COMMUNICATIONS
  • SECTION 9.1  POLICE RADIO
  • SECTION 9.2  LEADS

CHAPTER 10 PROPERTY
  • SECTION 10.1  EVIDENCE
  • SECTION 10.2  SEIZED/FORFEITED PROPERTY
  • SECTION 10.3  DIVISION OF POLICE PROPERTY

INDEX


Cleveland Division of Police - GENERAL POLICE ORDERS




REF:
Michael McGrath, Director of Public Safety
Calvin D. Williams, Chief of Police
Police Forms & Publications 
     [Note: now available - Cleveland Department of Justice Findings, Español (PDF)



Friday, June 19, 2015

New Tax Credit Project Funded in Clark Fulton, The Lofts at Lion Mills Scheduled to Break Ground Early 2016


DETROIT SHOREWAY COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFICE

For Immediate Release
Contact: Greg Baron
gbaron@dscdo.org
cell:  (216) 409-4801
June 19, 2015

Clark-Fulton, Cleveland, OH - The Detroit Shoreway Community Development Organization (DSCDO) is pleased to announce that the Lofts at Lion Mills project has been awarded Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) funding for 2015 by the Ohio Housing Finance Agency.

The project is one of only three projects in Cuyahoga County to receive LIHTC funding for 2015. DSCDO is the only real estate developer in Cleveland, both non-profit and private, to receive LIHTC funding three years in a row.

The $9 million project is an adaptive reuse of a mostly vacant commercial structure to create thirty-six (36) loft-style units with affordable rents. Additional amenities include eighteen (18) parking spaces, an elevator, a laundry facility, a community room, and open-concept floor plans.

The building was originally constructed for the Lion Knitting Mills in 1919, which produced knitted goods for the military and private labels for 78 years. Due to foreign competition, the company closed down in 1990.

The building was later occupied by Kredo Industrial Supply and has since been used primarily for storage. The building is scheduled to be added to the National Register of Historic Places and federal historic tax credits will help finance the rehabilitation.

The building is located at the intersection of West 25th Street and Meyer Avenue, two blocks north of MetroHealth Hospital, the largest employer on the West Side of Cleveland with 6,000 jobs, and will support MetroHealth’s $1.2 billion campus transformation.




Other recent investments on West 25th Street
Lofts at Lion Mills, 3256 West 25th Street, Cleveland Ohio 44109

The Lofts at Lion Mills is at the southern end of the La Villa Hispana (“The Hispanic Village”) district which is centered around the West 25th St. & Clark Ave. intersection. The neighborhood has the highest density Latino population in the State of Ohio, and project partners in developing La Villa Hispana include the Hispanic Business Center, the Hispanic Alliance, MetroHealth, the Stockyard, Clark-Fulton & Brooklyn Centre Community Development Office (SCFBC) and others.
 
Mayor Frank Jackson designated the Lofts at Lion Mills project as one of three citywide “priority” projects recommended to the Ohio Housing Finance Agency for low income housing tax credits. This designation helped the project receive bonus points in scoring.

The support of Dr. Akram Boutros, President and Chief Executive Officer of MetroHealth, was also critical to the project receiving funding. Councilman Brian Cummins has played a key role in the development of this project through his leadership and funding in helping DSCDO open a satellite office in July 2010 on Fulton Road to serve the neighborhoods of Stockyards, Clark-Fulton, and Brooklyn Centre.

Councilman Cummins and the SCFBC community development office have helped get 300 vacant and abandoned houses demolished in the past 5 years, and another 100 vacant and abandoned houses rehabbed.  

The Lofts at Lion Mills will help to advance an estimated $100 million in improvements (in addition to MetroHealth’s campus renewal) currently underway in the neighborhood.


Detroit Shoreway Community Development Organization
The Gordon Square Arcade Atrium, 6516 Detroit Avenue, Suite 1
Cleveland, OH  44102-3057
(216) 961-4242 ex 224 (216) 961-8830 fax

- ### -

Cleveland Federal Reserve Policy Summit on Housing, Human Capital & Inequality



Over the last few days I had the opportunity to attend the Cleveland Federal Reserve's conference on Housing, Human Capital and Inequality held in Pittsburgh.  (See bottom of article for a list of folks that joined me from Cleveland and Ohio.)

The conference was a very timely opportunity to meet and share information with people from all over the country, but particularly from Ohio and Pennsylvania - to discuss community and economic development. 

Timely, because the focus of the conference was centered on topics we are focusing on in Ward 14 Cleveland.  They included integrating a health and wellness initiative into our overall community and economic development strategies, and partnering with the Environmental Health Watch and MetroHealth and other organizations carryout the Engaging the Community in New Approaches to Healthy Housing" project.

Other topics included how communities can benefit from the new Federal Workforce Innovation & Opportunity Act (job training), and economic development through broadband technology investments like our W25 BIG Gig Project.

The Opening Plenary session featured Mayor Bill Peduto, Pittsburgh and former Mayor of Cleveland Jane Campbell, Director, National Development Council.

Thursday’s sessions brought together two important issues; Health, Wellness and Community Development and the new Federal Workforce Innovation & Opportunity Act.

BUILDING COMMUNITIES BASED ON WELLNESS
The first session there was about connecting environmental issues to community health.  The session was especially relevant to Cleveland and our near westside communities, as a collaborative initiative called "Engaging the Community in New Approaches to Healthy Housing".

REF: 

JOBS - WORKFORCE INNOVATION & OPPORTUNITIES
The last session Thursday featured Cleveland/Cuyahoga County’s own Grace A. Kilbane, Exec Dir, CLE/CUY Workforce Investment Board and other experts working on workforce issues.  The session gave an overview of the new Federal Workforce Innovation & Opportunity Act

REF: 

Friday morning kicked-off with a PechaKucha formatted presentation of seven organizations helping to redevelop and redefine Pittsburgh.

REF: 
  • ACTION-Housing - empowers people to build more secure and self-sufficient lives through the provision of decent, affordable housing, essential supportive services, asset building programs, and educational and employment opportunities.
  • Bike Pittsburgh - transforming Pittsburgh streets and communities into vibrant, healthy places by making them safe and accessible for everyone to bike and walk.
  • The Union Project - arose as an idea by a group of young Pittsburghers to create a neighborhood space where people could come together to connect, create, and celebrate (for fellowship, creativity, community, learning, and more). 
  • Allegheny Conference on Community Development - the Greater Pittsburgh Chamber of Commerce, the Pennsylvania Economy League of Greater Pittsburgh and the Pittsburgh Regional Alliance (PRA) – work together to improve the economy and the quality of life in southwestern Pennsylvania.
  • Hill Community Development Corporation - works in partnership with residents and stakeholders to create, promote, and implement strategies and programs that connect plans, policies and people to drive compelling community development opportunities in the Greater Hill District.
  • cityLAB - a nonprofit that performs experiments with the city as our labo­ratory. Experiments are chosen to seed economic development, generate buzz, and effect positive change in the city, from inside and out.
  • Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership - Formed by Downtown businesses, professionals, civic organizations, foundations, and residents, the PDP develops and implements innovative programs and initiatives to enhance the Downtown neighborhood. 
BROADBAND: THE NEW INFRASTRUCTURE
Friday’s first session focused the importance of broadband technology as a critical component of Cities’ new infrastructure. Topics covered, technology equity (digital-divide), advanced use of the technology in education, social innovation and business development and the internet of things.

REF: 

INNOVATIONS IN COMMUNITY & ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
The last session before the Closing Keynote address focused on innovated approaches to community and economic development occurring in Philadelphia and Pittsburgh.

REF: 
  • Economic Development South - a unique multi-municipal, corridor-based community development corporation that encompasses a significant portion of the South Pittsburgh/South Hills region of Allegheny County. 
  • 100 Resilient Cities - Pioneered by the Rockefeller Foundation (100RC) is dedicated to helping cities around the world become more resilient to the physical, social and economic challenges that are a growing part of the 21st century.
  • Philadelphia Association of Community Development Corporations - a citywide membership association of CDCs and affiliate organizations dedicated to advocacy, policy development and technical assistance for community development corporations and other organizations in their efforts to rebuild communities and revitalize neighborhoods. 

Folks joining me in representing Cleveland and Ohio at the conference included our very own Donna Nolen Brooks (Stockyard neighborhood, along with a bunch of others from the CLE Federal Reserve - conference host, including Mary Helen Petrus); Camille Billups (Cleveland Plus); Stephanie Cameron (Citizens Bank); John Corlett (The Center for Community Solutions); Lee Fields & Chalana Williams (First Federal Lakewood); Maura Harris (Ohio Community Development Corp. Assoc.); Kathryn Hexter (Center for Community Planning & Development, CSU); Holly Holtzen (Ohio Housing Finance Authority); Steven Kanner (CSU); Grace Kilbane (Cleveland/Cuyahoga County WIB); Emily Lungard (Enterprise Community Partners); Kevin McDaniel (United Way of Greater Cleveland); Dave Megenhardt (United Labor Agency); Vincent Papsidero (City of Columbus); Emma Petrie Barcelona (EDEN Inc.); Francisca Richter (Case Western Reserve University); David Rothenstein (Neighborhood Housing Services of Greater Cleveland); James Russell (Center for Population Dynamics of CSU); Molly Schnoke (CSU); Angela Shucjahose (Cleveland Tenants Organization); Kent Smith (District 8, Ohio House of Representatives); Brittany Zaehringer (GAR Foundation, Akron).





Thursday, June 18, 2015

Community Partners awarded grant, working on a $500k Community Health initiative



Congratulations to our community partners on their winning an award of $250,000 that will be matched by MetroHealth for the "Engaging the Community in New Approaches to Healthy Housing", a "BUILD Health Challenge Grant".  See the summary of the initiative below.




See the news article published on the award -
Cleveland partnership awarded $250,000 grant for work on asthma, lead prevention in homes
By Brie Zeltner, The Plain Dealer, June 13, 2015




Monday, June 15, 2015

2015 Ward 14 street resurfacing funding, projects and priorities

Riverside Avenue
Operations for $7.5 million in residential street resurfacing began in April 2015. Over 80 residential streets will be resurfaced this year throughout the City. 

This year’s resurfacing program is based on a new City of Cleveland Five-Year Capital Improvement Program and based on Pavement Management Ratings.

The City's $7.5 million resurfacing budget is allocated out per each of the 17-wards based on conditions and the number of poor rated streets.  The Ward 14 allocation for 2015 is $565,000 and the average for the year per/ward is $387,000.

The Ward 14 allocation is the third highest amount in the city and indicates the large number of poorly rated streets.  The new and increased resurfacing budget is planned to be increased even more beginning next year to $10 million per year.  In 2014 the allocation was $4.4 million.

The City's Administration is in the process of conducting a new pavement management inventory.  In lieu of a new inventory, the decisions of what streets to resurface in Ward 14 for this year have been made based on actual field inspections (separately by both the Council office and Streets Department).  


W. 38th Street
The list of streets and the cost for resurfacing for this year is provided below.  In addition, the Ward 14 inventory of streets, with our own rankings is listed below.  Generally the condition rankings from the Streets Department and Ward 14 office are aligned.

As you can see from the tables below, there are nine streets scheduled to be resurfaced this year in Ward 14, but there are another 38 streets that are ranked C/D to F.  Even with the increased funding this year and even more funding beginning next year, the City has a lot of poor rated streets to catch up on.  

When making street selections, other factors are taken into consideration in addition to the pavement conditions. There are difficult issues to consider such as how many households are being impacted by the investment and what percentage of the length of street is in the poorest condition.  In Ward 14 over the past few years, due to limited funding, we began spot re-surfacing to improve sections of streets that had very poor conditions in sections due to sub-rated utility-cut repairs and over-patching.

If residents have any questions or concerns as to the streets selected this year and the plans to accelerate re-surfacing, please call the Ward 14 office at 216-664-4238.

Other related area street projects:
In addition to the residential streets re-surfacing project, Denison Avenue ($9M)(Ridge Rd. to SR-176) and W. 25th Street ( I-71 to Detroit Avenue) is being completed in this construction season.  The re-decking of the overpass bridge at W. 25th Street and I-71 ($2.8M) is complete and two median strips with new trees have been installed as a part of the bridge project.  W. 73rd Street (Denison Ave. to Lorain) is scheduled for re-surfacing in 2016 in conjunction with funding from Cuyahoga County.

Plans and funding are also being finalized for Pearl Rd. ($9.8M) to be re-constructed from Brookpark Rd to I-71, and for Broadview Rd. ($3.5M) to be resurfaced from Brookpark to Pearl Rd.


Ward 14 Streets to be resurfaced in 2015:
1.     West 38th Street from Archwood Ave. to Denison Ave.
2.     Riverside Avenue from pearl Rd. to West 39th St.
3.     West 39th Place from Poe to Daisy Ave.
4.     West 52nd  Street from Eichorn to Storer Ave.
5.     West 58th Street from Denison to Storer Ave.
6.     Carlos Avenue from West 49th to West 52nd St.
7.     Carlyle Avenue from West 34th St. to Fulton Rd.
8.     Scranton Road from W. 25th St. to Englindale (Metro ER Access)
9.     West 30th Street from Sackett to Meye Ave.

See below list for more details regarding specifications and costs.


NOTE:  For best viewing of the embedded Scribd documents, please use the magnifying icon and full page icon at the bottom of each image to be able to see a larger image.




Complete inventory of streets reviewed by the Ward office in April 2015 
- with condition rankings and  field notes.




REF:
Residential Resurfacing Program Begins in Cleveland
City of Cleveland, April 15, 2015
Cleveland's street-paving budget will more than double, but other projects will 'have to wait'
By Leila Atassi, Northeast Ohio Media Group, March 23, 2015